Home Healthy Eating 7 Best Fresh Produce Delivery Services For Healthy Eating At Home – Women's Health

7 Best Fresh Produce Delivery Services For Healthy Eating At Home – Women's Health

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If there’s just one nutrition guideline you should know off the top of your head, it’s probably this one: Eat five servings of fruits and vegetables every day. While nutrition is a young science and there are ~plenty~ of things still up for debate, experts are pretty clear that getting your five-a-day is seriously beneficial.

“Eating fruits and vegetables helps lower your risk of chronic diseases, as they provide a plethora of health-helping antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals,” says plant-based nutritionist Amy Gorin, RDN. Produce is also delicious and versatile, and there are SO many different kinds to choose from that it’s easy to prevent fruit-and-veggie fatigue.

But here’s the issue: Only one in 10 Americans actually eats five servings per day. It’s a complicated problem. First of all, fresh foods like fruits and vegetables often cost more and don’t last as long as processed and packaged food. Plus, more than one in 10 Americans struggles with food insecurity, meaning they don’t even have access to adequate amounts of nutritious food. Even still, many people who have the ability to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables a day just don’t.

One solution that may be able to help some people up their intake of the good stuff: produce delivery services.

“The great thing about produce delivery services is that you make the decision to eat your fruits and veggies ahead of time,” Gorin says. “The obstacle of going to the grocery store to purchase your produce has been removed. When they appear at your door, all you have to do for many of them is wash and eat ’em.”

Oftentimes, these services send you a variety of different fruits and vegetables, so you keep up your creativity in the kitchen and score all sorts of nutrients. Though you really can’t go wrong with any legitimate produce delivery service, here are seven that are both highly-rated and widely available across the country.

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Best for Environmentalists: Hungry Harvest

As Hungry Harvest explains on their website, “one in five fruits and veggies go to waste for the most ridiculous reasons. Too big. Too small. Don’t quite look ‘right.’”

That’s where they come in. This service buys up “ugly produce” from farmers and distributors and boxes it up for delivery. Everything is fresh and just as delicious as what you’d find at the store; it just might be a little misshapen. And, in addition to a bounty of produce, you get the satisfaction of knowing that each delivery eliminates at least 10 pounds of food waste.

How it works: Sign up for either a weekly or bi-weekly delivery, then choose what size box you want and whether you want organic or conventional produce. Most boxes are a mix of fruits and vegetables, but there’s also a veggie-only option. Many boxes are also customizable, so you can ask for more of one thing and less of another. Currently, Hungry Harvest delivers to eight major metro areas in the eastern U.S.

Pricing: The mini harvest box (1-2 people) is $15, while the full harvest box (2-4 people) is $25 and the super harvest box (4-7 people) is $33. Organic versions of each are $28, $34, and $42, respectively.

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Best for Beginners: Farmbox Direct

If you want a little more control over what you get with each delivery, Farmbox Direct is a service to check out. Before each delivery, you’ll get a list of what’s in each box and can switch out up to five items with others that you prefer at no extra cost. Farmbox Direct also makes it easy to schedule deliveries months in advance and skip a delivery or cancel at any time. Each box also comes with recipe cards and is packed in recyclable packaging with recyclable ice packs.

How it works: Choose the size of your box and whether you want organic or all-natural produce. Then, schedule your deliveries for every week or every other week. Farmbox Direct currently ships to all states in the continental U.S., although delivery may be unavailable in certain areas.

Pricing: All-natural boxes are $43.95 for a small (1-2 people), $48.95 for a medium (2-4 people), and $53.95 for a large (5 or more people). Organic boxes are $49.75 for a small, $57.95 for a medium, and $68.95 for a large.

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Best for Avid Cooks: Misfits Market

Like Hungry Harvest, Misfits Market rescues ugly produce from the waste pile and ships it right to your door. Their boxes are all organic and non-GMO, and average at about 40 percent less expensive than buying the same types of produce at the supermarket. Convenient and budget-friendly? Sign me up.

While you don’t have much control over what’s in your box, the Misfits Market website publishes recipes every few days to help you brainstorm how to use your haul. There’s even one for veggie scrap focaccia, which really takes their no-waste philosophy to the next level!

How it works: Choose your box size, your preferred delivery day, and whether you want weekly or bi-weekly deliveries. Before each delivery, you’ll get an email confirmation and the option to add gourmet prepared foods. Currently, they deliver to 30 states on the East coast and in the Midwest.

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Best For People Who Hate Grocery Stores: Imperfect Foods

If you want a delivery box that comes with more than just produce, Imperfect Foods is for you. Like other boxes on this list, their focus is on minimizing food waste by selling “ugly produce.” But unlike other services, they offer a massive variety of other grocery staples that you can add to your box each week, from dairy items to pantry favorites.

How it works: Sign up for either organic or conventional weekly produce delivery, then indicate the size of your household is (1-2, 3-4, or 5+ people). Specify whether you’re a low-carb eater, vegan, vegetarian, or someone who eats everything and you’ll receive a box tailored to your needs. Then, you can choose to get just produce, or add a meat and fish pack, a snack pack, or a grains pack to your weekly deliveries. You can also add a huge variety of grocery items as needed each week.

Imperfect Foods delivers to most of the West South Central region, Midwest, Northeast, and all along the West Coast.

Pricing: Prices vary greatly depending on which items you choose, but produce boxes start at $16 for conventional produce (1-2 people), and $24 for organic produce (1-2 people) and go up from there.

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Best for Adventurous Eaters:Melissa’s Produce

If you’d rather use your produce box as a way to try totally new-to-you items, Melissa’s Produce totally delivers. “I’m a big fan of Melissa’s Produce,” Gorin says. “They sell some really out-of-the-box offerings, which makes eating your fruits and veggies exciting.” There are specialty items you might already love, like blood oranges and gooseberries, as well as things that aren’t widely known in American culture, like green buddha hands and black garlic.

How it works: Unlike other produce companies, Melissa’s doesn’t offer a subscription service, so you have to place a unique order every time you want one. For people with inconsistent schedules, it’s perfect. You can shop their site and add individual produce items to your cart, or choose one of their pre-designed boxes. The best news? They deliver anywhere in the U.S.!

Pricing: Prices vary greatly, since you can build your own order from scratch or pick a pre-designed box.

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Best for Farm-to-Table Aficionados: The Chef’s Garden

Unlike other produce delivery services that get produce from various farms, The Chef’s Garden grows produce on their own farm. And, as their name suggests, they deliver produce to many restaurant chefs, so you know that what you’re getting is expert-approved. You can choose to subscribe to their Best of the Season box or just order another of their other boxes (like the Leafy Greens box) when you want to.

How it works: Choose from one of six different boxes—four regular produce boxes, a craft cocktail box filled with booze-friendly produce, and a greens box—on their site and get it shipped anywhere in the U.S.

If you pick the Best of the Season box, you can choose to have it shipped one time, every week, or every month.

Pricing: The Best of the Season box is $89 for a small (1-2 people), $125 for a medium (3-4 people), and $175 for a large (4-6 people). You can also get a seasonal produce box for $59, and other items for between $59 and $89.

TRY THE CHEF’S GARDEN

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Best for West-Coasters: Farm Fresh To You

Not everyone loves all fruits and veggies equally, and Farm Fresh to You (called Full Circle in some locations) makes it easy to customize your box and get just the right amount of each. You can also add specialty grocery items hand-picked by their team. Much of the produce comes from their farms and other farms nearby.

How it Works: Choose between various types of produce boxes—the traditional CSA, all-fruit, all-veggie, and more. Then choose weekly or biweekly delivery. From there, you can customize each box and add various items as you like. Farm Fresh to You delivers in California, while Full Circle delivers to Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska.

Pricing: The mixed fruit and veggie box comes in four different sizes: small (1-2 people) for $27.50, regular (2-4 people) for $35, more (4-6 people) for $49, and monster (6-8 people) for $61. Prices vary for other boxes.

TRY FARM FRESH TO YOU

Christine is a food writer and recipe developer in Durham, North Carolina.

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